Tattered Past

Tattered Past: My ongoing journey through genealogy, history, writing, self-exploration and art. ~~~ Rita Ackerman





Monday, April 2, 2012

The Funny Side of Autism

Saturday my husband and I went to the local Barnes & Noble to listen to an Arizona author talk about her book on autism. Lisa Masters wrote "The Funny Side of Autism: Funny Things Children with Autism Do and Say" to help raise awareness of this growing problem and to educate people that there is much, much more to autism than "Rainman."

I listened to Lisa and people in the audience talk about their autistic children. The delights, the struggles and the hope for each and every one.

One of the quotes I came home with is "It isn't that they can't do it . . . its that they can't do it right now." He talked about taking his daughter to the theater and how fearful she became. When she was a little older she wanted to go again so he said he'd hold her hand and if she became fearful they would leave. She went in, fearful, but determined to see the film. Once it started she was great and now loves going to the theater.

His daughter was there and she talked about a couple of funny things she has said. Amazing.

The new numbers are that 1 in 88 children has autism. The chances you will be affected is extremely high. If you are a parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, caregiver or just concerned please visit Lisa's web site and blog. Pick up her book or the new one which is coming out this month. www.TheFunnySideofAutism.Com


There really is a funny side to autism.

Lisa Masters and her book.



Those of you in Arizona, Lisa will be a part of an event on April 20 at The Compound, 7000 E. Mayo Blvd., Scottsdale. For more information go to the calendar tab at:
Benefits The Autism Society

2 comments:

  1. Rita, I just heard those statistics on the news. I'm not sure whether the number has increased in recent years or whether they're just recognizing it more, but it is absolutely something each of us will be affected by in one way or another.

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  2. It's a combination and part of the problem is they still don't understand it. The spectrum is so broad from high functioning like my grandson to the ones who don't function well at all. But great strides are being made. Education the public will be a big help.

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